Lamb Koftas

We don’t heat a huge amount of red meat, but a few months back, my biggest boy was reading and the characters in the book described the Lamb Koftas they were eating.

Will had never heard of them before so he asked me about them and then asked me to make them.

They were very simple to make and a winner of a meal with 6 empty plates, so they have been added to the menu and we hope you like them as much as we do!

  • 500g lamb mince
  • 100g chick peas, drained and rinsed
  • 1 small brown onion
  • 2-3 clove cloves garlic
  • 1 tsp tahini
  • 1 tbsp hemp seeds
  • 1/2 tsp ground turmeric
  • 1 tsp dried paprika
  • 1 tsp ground coriander
  • 1 tsp ground cumin
  • 1/2-1 tsp dried chilli flakes (depending on the amount of bite you like)
  • 2 tsp finely grated lemon zest
  • good pinch salt

Optional: Dressing of Minted yoghurt (see below the recipe) and crunch of toasted pine nuts or pumpkin seeds

Into your food processor/thermo cooker, place the onion, garlic, chick peas, lemon, seeds, tahini and all of the herbs and spices.

Process until they are finely chopped (Speed 4, 8 seconds, scrape down and repeat)

While the machine is still processing, add in the lamb in through the top opening and process until the mixture is very well combined and quite smooth.

Place the mixture into a bowl, cover and place in the fridge for at least an hour (over night is fine). This will help the mixture to hold together without egg as a binder.

Divide the mixture into 12 and form in to small fat sausage shapes.

Slide on to skewers and cook over medium heat on an oiled bbq or griddle plate. If you’re using bamboo skewers, soak them in water for at least half an hour first and it’ll stop them burning on the heat.

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We like to serve ours with ribbons of carrot and cucumber.

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We also used minted yoghurt as a dressing (you can used which ever kind of unflavoured yoghurt fits your dietary needs). About 4 tbsp mixed with 2 tsp of finely torn fresh mint.

Top with toasted pine nuts (or pumpkin seeds).

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If Macros are important to you here are the details. Each serve is 1 kofta (that is 1/12 of the mix)

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Enjoy 🙂

Baked Veggie Omelette

A little while ago I posted my Salmon Tart and I have had a few requests for a vegetarian version.

So, here is a my baked veggie omelette – you’ll need a frying pan that can transfer from the stove top into an oven.

I tend to make tarts like these so I have them on hand work work lunches – delicious cold or warm . Or if you’re in a rush, grab a couple of slices out of the fridge and steam some extra greens – speedy and filling dinner!

  • 8 medium eggs
  • 1 large zucchini
  • 12 swiss brown mushrooms, finely sliced
  • 250g spinach
  • 1 tsp olive oil
  • 1 tbsp nutritional yeast
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • Optional: 50g grated tasty cheese

Heat the oil in the frying pan, then slice the zucchini into rounds and place into the frying pan.

Fry for 1 minutes until the first side is golden, then flip over the zucchini before adding in the mushrooms to the pan. Cook, stirring for another minute until the mushrooms start to soften. Then add the spinach to the pan.

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it’s a LOT of spinach!

Add in the salt, pepper and nutritional yeast and stir through to make sure the veggies are evenly coated.

Whisk together the eggs and then pour evenly over the veggies.

Turn the frying pan to a gentle heat and allow to cook until the side of the omelette just start to pull away from the sides of the pan – the top of the omelette will still be very wet at this point.

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Sprinkle the top with cheese if you wish before popping it in a pre-heated 180C oven for about 10 minutes or until the top just stops wobbling … Remember that the eggs will keep cooking while it is warm so if you leave it in the oven for too long you’ll get a rubbery omelette.

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Let it cool and then slice into 6.

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Store it in the fridge for about 3 days.

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If macros are important to you here are the details (which includes the cheese) for 1 slice, which is 1/6th  of the omelette:

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Enjoy 🙂

Basic Beef Burgers

Burgers aren’t a very frequent meal in our house. I’m not sure why. Peter and the kids adore them and serving themselves makes for a very happy family meal.

It’s been several weeks in isolation now, and our local supermarket is still very low on many things (totally empty shelves in many aisles) so our grocery shopping and planning has looked a little different. We’ve needed to be a little more creative and adaptive with what we can access – that’s ok by me!!

When my biggest boys asked for Cheeseburgers, we went back to the style of burger patties that we haven’t made in a long time. Very simple, quick to make and not many ingredients. Devoured by everyone. Winning.

  • 500g beef mince
  • 1 large carrot
  • 1 medium brown onion
  • 1 tsp fresh chopped thyme (or dried Italian Style herbs)
  • 4 tbsp Nutritional Yeast*
  • 1 clove garlic, finely grated (or 1/2 tsp dried garlic flakes)
  • ground salt and pepper to taste
  • 2 tsp coconut aminos (or soy sauce)
  • Optional: 2 tbsp hemp seeds

*You can add in 2 tbsp of suitable breadcrumbs here if you’d prefer.

Grate the onion and carrot and mix together with all other ingredients, except the beef.

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Break up the beef mince and add to the carrot mix.

Smoosh (yes, that’s the technical term!) the mince in until well combined. You can do this with a spoon, your hands,  or even a short burst in the food processor.

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Using your hands, for the mix into patties and lay on a lined baking tray.

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Place into a preheated 180 oven for about 30 minutes, turning them over after 20 minutes. You can also fry them in  a pan with a little olive oil if you’d prefer.

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Makes 6-8 burger patties (depending on their size)

We like to have this as a ‘serve yourself meal’. Some add only cheese and cucumber, others add EVERYTHING!

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They are delicious in  a bunless burger ….

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Or with your favourite bun – We particularly enjoy them with fresh spelt/hemp buns!!!

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Enjoy 🙂

Sweet Potato Rolls

As are you all, we are spending a LOT more time at home at the moment.

Which, I guess, in good news – means more time for baking!

Although getting all the ingredients we normally use has been a little tricky….

But sweet potatoes are plentiful in our garden right now, so they are featuring quite a bit on our plates!

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I was thinking about making rolls to go with our soup, when I remembered that I had seen these yummy looking rolls on ‘Super Healthy kids. The original (see the link) is a sweet version that they eat in the states for Thanksgiving.

I didn’t want a sweet roll (although I’m sure I will another time!) and I needed to adapt it to our dietary requirement (no egg, or dairy). So I got experimenting.

Our family adores these rolls. Even the sworn sweet potato hater inhaled 3 before I stopped him!

Hope you enjoy them too 🙂

  • 3 1/2 cup flour (2 cup plain & 1.5 cups wholemeal) – we use spelt
  • 1 flat tablespoon yeast, active dry
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup, mashed Sweet potato, cooked (about 1 medium potato)
  • 1 cup milk of choice (oat milk works well here)
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 1 tsp each of rosemary and thyme, finely diced (or 1 tsp dried Italian Style herbs)
  • spray olive oil
  • extra flour for rolling

Start by peeling and dicing your sweet potato. Then steam it until it is soft (approx 4-5 mins in a microwave)

While the potato is steaming, place into your bowl/machine (see instructions below for multiple machine methods), the flour, salt, herbs, oil and yeast.

As soon as the sweet potato is cooked, drain it and mash it. Measure out your 1 cup and add it to the cup of milk. The milk doesn’t need to be warmed – by adding the potato to the milk, you’ll bring both the milk and the potato to the right temperature to make sure you don’t kill off the yeast.

Whisk the milk and potato together until they are roughly combined and then pour into the flour mix.

Give a rough mix of the dough for a few seconds and allow it to sit for 5 minutes (it won’t be all combined at this stage). Use a wooden spoon in the bowl if you’re doing it by hand, or speed 3 for 5 seconds in a thermal cooker, or about 5 seconds with a dough hook in a stand mixer.

Now get kneading –

For a bread machine: Use the dough only function. Set and walk away.

For a stand mixer with a dough hook: you’ll need to mix for 6-7 minutes

For a thermo cooker: set your knead function (for a less powerful machine, like a Bellini, you might need an extra minute or two)

By hand: flour the bench and get your muscles ready! Knead until your dough is smooth and elastic.

Place the dough ball in a lightly oiled bowl, cover with a cloth and let rise in a warm area until doubled in size – about an hour, or until your machine has finished it’s rise function.

 

Remove from the bowl and knock down the dough.
Cut it into two and roll each one into a circle – like you’re making a pizza base.
Cut each circle in to 8 wedges (again, like a pizza).
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Then start at the outside edge (where the the pizza crust would be) and roll toward the point to make your crescent shape.
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Little rolls, ready to start the second rise
Place on a lined baking dish, spray lightly with olive oil and then allow to rest in a warm place until the have doubled in size again (roughly another hour)
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2nd rise complete – into the oven they go
While the dough is doing it’s second rise, preheat your oven to 180C degrees.
When the second rise is complete, place into the preheated oven. Bake for 12-15 minutes or until golden brown. The bottom will sound hollow when you tap it.
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Delicious perfection!
Remove from the oven and cool for just a couple of minutes before you dig in!
Makes 16 rolls.
Enjoy 🙂

Feeding Our Family and Monthly Meal Planning – What works for us.

Over the last few years when I have talked about monthly meal planning and shopping or the way that we eat as a (fairly) big family and on a tight budget people look at me like I’m a teensy bit crazy.

Um … they’re probably right.

But – then I get a bajillion questions and I feel like I never get to answer them completely.

So here, in one place, I’ve brought it all together.

How we plan and how we approach food and feeding at our place.

Please let me be very clear – I know this won’t work for everyone. But this is what works well for us. There are 6 of us. My husband works full time, I juggle a couple of jobs. We both volunteer with our Church and sports. We want to fit in exercise and gardening and then there is allllllll of the stuff that comes with 4  VERY active children! And on top of that – we also have food allergies and sensory issues to deal with so eating out or grabbing food on the fly doesn’t always work (or suit our budget!).

Firstly. I write a menu and do a grocery shop for a monthIt looks a bit like this (actually at the moment, it isn’t footy season so it’s missing a weekend game and 2 training sessions!!):

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Our menus change with the season and what is growing locally

You can check out this previous post about how I actually shop and budget.

You don’t feel like the thing on the menu for that night? No worries – There are 20 other meals to choose from, so switch it up!

I talk to the kids as I’m writing it and we all give ideas as a family about what we like and are enjoying at the moment – they feel included and it helps me when I’m stuck for ideas!

It makes sure that it takes into account what activities we have on each day, what our work loads look like and any major things on that month. No good planning a 3 course meal for dinner and then only having 20 minutes at home in between gymnastics and jujitsu to make it!

You’ll see that we have a deliberate plan to eat left-overs (usually Sunday night) so that we don’t have food waste.

How do we eat as a family?

  • We try to eat foods that are largely unrefined. And with a heavy emphasis on plant based foods. Fruit, veg, beans and lentils, nut and seeds, whole grains etc. Processing in and of itself isn’t a bad thing, but we try to avoid too many ultra processed foods.IMG_20191017_175142_869
  • We eat a rainbow – of natural colour! Lots of variety, fruits, veg and all manner of plants – raw, cooked, hidden and visible. Make it a challenge to eat the most colours and variety. Don’t forget that frozen veg and tinned beans etc can be a great, simple, budget friendly option to help you out here.

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    Choosing variety and colour!
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Literally turning platters into rainbows!
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So many ways to eat green!
  • When we eat meat we don’t have huge portions and we don’t make it the focus of the meal – more like a side. And we bulk up the  meal with mushrooms, beans and veg as much as possible. It is very easy to get enough protein in the western world, but as a nation we don’t do well at eating enough veg or getting enough fibre (so critical to our health and wellbeing) so this is a good way to encourage it.

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    Veggie Bolognese – mushroom and lentil style
  • As parents, we are in charge. We make the food decisions in our  house. I absolutely get that this one is controversial. And if you are going to make changes to align with this – it will take time and there will be resistance. And yes, I completely understand that this will change as the children get older (they range from almost 6 to 11.5 right now). But, I have a better idea of what their nutritional needs are. If there is food that I don’t want them to eat, I do not buy it. It’s too hard to have it in the house and then have to police it. (Same goes for me and icecream – we do not keep it in the house because it is my downfall!!!)
  • We subscribe very much to a ‘We provide, they decide’ approach to eating. You can check out more from Ellyn Satter  about the division of food responsibilities. This does mean that our children have the right to decide if they eat and how much they eat of the meals provided. BUT there are NO alternatives. The family meal is the family meal. This removes pressure and battles from meal time. There is no coercion around food or finishing everything on their plates. We model the food and eating behaviours we want them to share, and over time they learn to trust and listen to their bodies, serve themselves and and make good food choices. We do a lot of placing everything in the middle and letting them serve themselves. Below are rice paper wraps, fish wedges and salad, Mexican wraps/bowls plus nuggets and veg

 

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They learn to love their food!
  • We are aware of our kids likes/dislike and food preferences around textures (due to SPD) etc – But that does not mean that we simply stop serving the foods that one of them dislikes. We do talk to them when we’re creating our menu. Then they know that there is lots of food coming up that they do enjoy. If we are serving a meal that we know is not a favourite, we make sure that there are some things on the plate that they are comfortable with. If we are serving up a new meal (and one I suspect will not be well received!) I make sure that a small portion of it is on the plate (simply having the food near them helps with exposure and familiarity) but kept a bit separate from the other familiar food. Below is when we introduced mushroom stroganoff – all in one for the adults and separately, without pressure for the kids.

 

  • We encourage our kids to be involved with food, right from growing our veggies and helping with the gardening to helping us to prepare and serve the food.

 

  • We allow and encourage food exploration. Touching, poking, licking, sniffing … all fine (at our home dinner table!). Also we talk about our food in a way that removes pressure: What colour it is? Does it crunch or squish when you bite it? It is different cooked to raw? Can you write you name with it or make a face?
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Mum! Listen to this crunch!
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Wonder who is responsible for this one?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Food is not ‘good or bad’. It is not a moral choice. We do talk about what food gives us and how it makes us feel – this food will give me lots of protein and help me build up my muscles. This food will give me good energy to get through a long gymnastics session. This food has lots of fibre and it will help me to poop (a kids favourite!). If I eat too much of this food my tummy doesn’t feel good. We also talk about our favourite foods and our special memories around food – after all food is about far more than just nutrients!
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Muscles from our Hulk muffins
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Christmas Food with my extended family – my very favourite celebration!
  • We keep food really simple. We eat a lot of food that looks like this (you’ll see in our menu that we call them ‘serve yourself platters’):
  • There is no ‘snack box’ in the pantry filled with packaged and ‘easy’ snacks and the kids are not free to just help themselves whenever they want. There are defined meal and snack times. After which the kitchen is closed. This helps them to learn to listen to their bodies and actually be ready to eat properly at meal times. Kids (and adults!) don’t actually need to graze all day long. Of course there are times when then there needs to be an exception – if they ask, they know they can usually grab an apple or a carrot.
  • We cook in bulk and freeze. There are deliberate left-overs to make filling lunches and batch cooking allows the main part of the meal to be used in different ways, with very little effort on my part!
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Veggie egg cups ready for the freezer
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Bulk Mexican Chicken – this will portioned into the freezer and become wraps/bowls, enchiladas and tacos

Bulk bolognese gets turned into a 2nd meal of empanadas

  • We make school lunches the night before, for kids and adults alike. No exceptions. I cannot even fathom the stress of making 6 lunches in the morning whilst getting ready for school and work, getting washing on the line and starting dinner. Eek! Made the night before I have space to think about it, make sure is is varied and I sleep easier knowing is it one less job in the morning!
  • We snack plan/prep. As well as having a meal menu, we always have snack basics in the house ready to go.  It means that we can eat well with little fuss. Our go to snacks are lots of veggies and fruit then we add things like hummus, yoghurt, bliss balls, roasted almonds, hard boiled eggs, pikelets and popcorn.

 

 

So there is it.

We plan, we prepare, we eat simply, we eat variety that is heavily plant-based.

Importantly, our kids are involved with the food at all stages but we do not pressure them about food or force them to eat it. Parents decide what’s on offer, we give them opportunity to serve and explore, we model healthy eating behaviours but food is not a battle ground!

If you have made it to the end … well done! I know it seems confronting when you see it all  together. Can I encourage you if you are feeling overwhelmed to start simply. Pick one thing and go for it. Small changes really add up over time. Get your family involved and work on it together!

Good luck – I’m always here to answer questions!

J x

Pumpkin Meatballs

This dinner was so well received by all of my kids that I was actually a little bit shocked!

The 2 big boys had seconds and asked for thirds, the 2 little ones totally cleaned their plates (including actual licking!). Ellie even asked if she could have them for her birthday dinner 😮 Now they are a very firm family favourite.

They are pretty simple to make, they make a lot and it’s easy to have a meat meal but use only a little meat whilst boost it with a good serve of veg to help meet our daily targets and to really increase the fibre content – Good for your health and good for your budget too! I think they key is to make the mixture fairly smooth.

  • 1kg beef mince
  • 1 400g tin butter beans, drained and rinsed (kidney beans and black beans are great too)
  • 300g pumpkin
  • 1 tsp dried Italian herbs
  • 1/2 tsp pink salt
  • A few grinds of pepper
  • 1/2 cup GF bread crumbs**
  • 1 tbsp garlic olive oil
  • 600ml tomato pasata
  • 1/2 cup hot veggie stock
  • Good pinch pink salt flakes
  • Fresh basil
  • Pasta of choice to serve

**for a deeper savoury flavour and to further boost the nutritional value of this meal, instead of bread crumbs, I often use 1/3 cup of Nutritional Yeast, 1/3 cup of hemp seed.

Roughly cut the pumpkin and place into your processor, then process until very fine. (Speed 5, 8 seconds, scrape down and repeat).

Now add in the beans, herbs, salt and pepper in your food processor and process until well combined. (Speed 4, 10secs)

Add in the bread crumbs** and mix again until well combined (speed 4, 8 secs)

Whilst processing (Speed 4), add in the beef mince through the top chute, then continue mixing until well combined and fairly smooth. Blitz for a little longer or at a higher speed if you want less visible ‘bits’.

Place mix into the fridge for at least an hour, but up to overnight.

Using a heaped teaspoon of the mixture, roll the meat balls (or make bigger patties)

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this version has kidney beans and I have left them a little chunkier in texture

Heat the oil in a fry pan and fry meatballs on each side until golden.

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Add in the pasata, stock, pinch of salt and basil and simmer gently for 5-6 minutes before turning balls and simmer for a further 5-6 minutes or entirely cooked through.

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Serve on your favourite pasta and top with a little cheese that suits your diet.

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We use a mixture of GF pasta and steamed green beans as our base

*Recently when we’ve been making these I’ve been baking them to avoid the crazy splatter on my stove. Brown them with the oil in the frying pan then pop them in a big baking dish, pour over the pasata and stock, top with basil and then cover with alfoil. Place in to a preheated 200C for 25 minutes.

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If you want cheese on top, remove alfoil and sprinkle with grated cheese then return baking dish to oven for the last 10 minutes

Makes 12-14 patties or about 24 meat balls

Enjoy 🙂

 

 

What’s in Jessie’s kitchen?

This post is to help give you an idea of the kinds of things you might need/want in your kitchen if you are a family with multiple food allergies who is looking for what you CAN eat!

After a horrible mouse plague when we lived in the desert (we’d sometimes kill more than 20 in a night inside!!), my husband agreed that everything needed to be airtight – so you can check my fridge and pantry out below:

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Nuttelex: We use Nuttlelex (a vegan butter) for the dairy free option. But we try and keep it to a minimum. A separate knife is always used here.

Butter: Plain butter without additives for the non dairy free.

Milks: Full cream cows milk for Peter and the boys, and Ellie and I use mostly oat milk but also rice and almond milk, depending on what it is we’re cooking/drinking.

Yoghurts: Homemade dairy and homemade soy.

Eggs: 5 of the 6 of us can eat eggs now (YAY!). These mostly come from friend’s chooks.

Cheese: Dairy Cheese and Bio Cheese

Dates: Medjool dates – I buy them in bulk as they are the base for soooo many things we make.

Dips and spreads: Cream Cheese (soy and dairy), sunflower seed butter& hummus,

Herbs/Spices: minced garlic, ginger and chilli, coconut aminos

We always have loads of fruit and vegetables on hand for easy snacks.

Frozen stuff: I am lucky enough to have a big freezer. It is spilt in to 6 labelled drawers (yes, I’m a massive nerd!).

Drawer 1: Breads and scrolls, pizzas and savoury muffins. These are in zip lock bags, to pull out easily for lunch-boxes.

Drawer 2: Baked goods and sauces. These are all the cakes, muffins, pikelets, frozen pastry or raw pie crusts etc. Also home-made gravies (in reusable squeezey pouches), jars of salsa, apple sauce and tablespoons of aquafaba.

Drawer 3: Meat. I buy for a month at a time based on our menu and portion it out and label it before freezing.

Drawer 4: Pre-made meals. I cook in bulk and freeze the left overs.

Drawer 5: Frozen fruits, herbs. Peeled, overripe bananas, peeled and seeded avocados and mangoes, berries, and extra herbs from my garden.

Drawer 6: Frozen Veg – peas, corn, spinach, green beans etc.

In the pantry we have:

Flours: Lots of different kinds but we largely use spelt or a GF mix. 20151023_212005

Sweeteners: Honey, maple syrup, golden syrup, rice malt syrup, coconut sugar, also icing sugar for cakes.

Carbohydrates: We use mostly brown or wild rice, but also quinoa, corn cous cous and a mix of GF pasta, spaghetti and Slim Pasta.

No egg: an egg replacer made by Orgran

Cereals: Mostly we have porridge made with plain rolled oats, but we also make our own muesli (with a mix of seeds and dried fruits) and have some Freedom Foods cereals (at the moment we have the Rice Puffs). Also rolled quinoa and polenta. Plus GF weetbix and Oat bran flakes.

Condiments etc: salt and pepper, spices (galore!), tomato, bbq, (homemade) sweet chilli sauce and coconut aminos. We use balsamic, red wine, white and apple cider vinegars, Massel stock powder (chicken, beef and vegetable style). The oil we use is mostly olive oil but also occasionally coconut oil or rice bran. I make my own Mexican Spice mix and French Onion Soup mix. Nutritional yeast features heavily too.

Spreads: Honey/maple syrup, vegemite and of course there is always a huge jar of Sunflower Seed Butter

Dried fruits: Sultanas apricots and prunes are the staples.

For baking: GF baking powder, bi-carb, glucose syrup, vanilla bean paste, cocoa/cacao.

Seeds and nuts: the regular seeds are sunflower seeds, hemp seeds, pumpkin seeds, flax seeds and chia seeds. Our regular morning tea snacks are a mixture of almonds that I dry roast, dried chick peas and dried broad beans, as well as a small sprinkling of dried fruit. In winter we have a soup mix that I make up with red lentils, yellow and green split peas and barley. Safe nuts in our house are almonds and walnuts.

Crackers and biscuits: Multi-grain rice/quinoa squares, and wholegrain sa-ka-ta rice crackers. Biscuits are normally home-made but we keep a back up packet of Macro’s ginger nuts too.

Tins: Beans and legumes, coconut cream and milk, bbq baked beans. Crushed tomatoes. Tins of salmon.

Special treats: Organ makes a good custard powder. Mini marshmallows or Sweet William chocolate or choc chips, also FreeFrom Cake mix is often on standby. Popcorn kernels – so cheap and easy!!

If they are available, for all that I buy, I tend to go for organic, preservative free and Australian grown/made where ever possible.

 

Tasty Tacos

I have never been a mince fan … and my family and friends harass me constantly for it. ‘ But it’s just so versatile’, ‘what if I just grind up a steak for you?’. There’s just something about the texture that makes me feel all squeamish.

Anyway, it turns out that I have a husband and children who adore Mexican food … hello minced meat.

Since our diet is already restricted, I figured that I needed to try and learn to eat mince so that there were some more options open to us – I find I can manage it when it is in a largely veggie based meal like this one, or in our bolognese.

Tacos are are MASSIVE WINNER in our house so we hope you enjoy them too!

**If you are after a vegan option for your tacos – check out below the main recipe for how we make the switch.

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My veggie loving little sous chef
  • 400g mince (beef, turkey or chicken)
  • 2 tbsp garlic infused olive oil
  • 1 finely diced brown onion
  • 1 400g tin brown lentils, drained and rinsed
  • Taco Shells
  • 1 large jar Mexican salsa
  • 2 tbsp Mexican Seasoning
  • 1 fist sized piece of pumpkin
  • 1 400g tin kidney beans
  • Toppings – spinach, avocado, cucumber, tomatoes, corn, cheese etc etc

Heat the oil in a large frying pan and cook the onion til soft. Add the mince and brown.

Then add the seasoning and salsa. Then add the lentils and mix well.

In your processor, finely grate the pumpkin, and then add the kidney beans (black beans go well here too!) and process until very fine.

Add veggie mix to the meat mix and stir to combine.

Bring to a gentle simmer for about 20 mins until the meat is cooked and the veggies are soft..

Heat Taco shells according to pack directions and while they are heating, prepare all salad ingredients.

Serve with mince mix at the bottom, salad next and sprinkle of the cheese your diet allows. It’s a great ‘make-your-own’ meal for the kids too.

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**The Vegan option:

Omit the minced meat and add in 300g of finely diced firm mushrooms, use them at the same place in the recipe as the mince goes.

Then when you are adding in the lentils, add 1 more additional tin of drained and rinsed lentils.

Make sure you use a suitable plant based cheese – and that’s it! Super easy and very tasty!

This recipe makes enough meat mix for 2 family dinners for us – we freeze the other half in an air tight container – perfect for when you neeeeed tacos next time 😉

Extra Tip: If you need or want to go grain free – then using large lettuce leaves as your taco cup works really well, and you still get a lovely crunch (and messy hands!). This is also a good option if you are soy free as I’ve yet to find pre made shells without soy.

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Enjoy 🙂