Feeding Our Family and Monthly Meal Planning – What works for us.

Over the last few years when I have talked about monthly meal planning and shopping or the way that we eat as a (fairly) big family and on a tight budget people look at me like I’m a teensy bit crazy.

Um … they’re probably right.

But – then I get a bajillion questions and I feel like I never get to answer them completely.

So here, in one place, I’ve brought it all together.

How we plan and how we approach food and feeding at our place.

Please let me be very clear – I know this won’t work for everyone. But this is what works well for us. There are 6 of us. My husband works full time, I juggle a couple of jobs. We both volunteer with our Church and sports. We want to fit in exercise and gardening and then there is allllllll of the stuff that comes with 4  VERY active children! And on top of that – we also have food allergies and sensory issues to deal with so eating out or grabbing food on the fly doesn’t always work (or suit our budget!).

Firstly. I write a menu and do a grocery shop for a monthIt looks a bit like this (actually at the moment, it isn’t footy season so it’s missing a weekend game and 2 training sessions!!):

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Our menus change with the season and what is growing locally

You can check out this previous post about how I actually shop and budget.

You don’t feel like the thing on the menu for that night? No worries – There are 20 other meals to choose from, so switch it up!

I talk to the kids as I’m writing it and we all give ideas as a family about what we like and are enjoying at the moment – they feel included and it helps me when I’m stuck for ideas!

It makes sure that it takes into account what activities we have on each day, what our work loads look like and any major things on that month. No good planning a 3 course meal for dinner and then only having 20 minutes at home in between gymnastics and jujitsu to make it!

You’ll see that we have a deliberate plan to eat left-overs (usually Sunday night) so that we don’t have food waste.

How do we eat as a family?

  • We try to eat foods that are largely unrefined. And with a heavy emphasis on plant based foods. Fruit, veg, beans and lentils, nut and seeds, whole grains etc. Processing in and of itself isn’t a bad thing, but we try to avoid too many ultra processed foods.IMG_20191017_175142_869
  • We eat a rainbow – of natural colour! Lots of variety, fruits, veg and all manner of plants – raw, cooked, hidden and visible. Make it a challenge to eat the most colours and variety. Don’t forget that frozen veg and tinned beans etc can be a great, simple, budget friendly option to help you out here.

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    Choosing variety and colour!
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Literally turning platters into rainbows!
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So many ways to eat green!
  • When we eat meat we don’t have huge portions and we don’t make it the focus of the meal – more like a side. And we bulk up the  meal with mushrooms, beans and veg as much as possible. It is very easy to get enough protein in the western world, but as a nation we don’t do well at eating enough veg or getting enough fibre (so critical to our health and wellbeing) so this is a good way to encourage it.

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    Veggie Bolognese – mushroom and lentil style
  • As parents, we are in charge. We make the food decisions in our  house. I absolutely get that this one is controversial. And if you are going to make changes to align with this – it will take time and there will be resistance. And yes, I completely understand that this will change as the children get older (they range from almost 6 to 11.5 right now). But, I have a better idea of what their nutritional needs are. If there is food that I don’t want them to eat, I do not buy it. It’s too hard to have it in the house and then have to police it. (Same goes for me and icecream – we do not keep it in the house because it is my downfall!!!)
  • We subscribe very much to a ‘We provide, they decide’ approach to eating. You can check out more from Ellyn Satter  about the division of food responsibilities. This does mean that our children have the right to decide if they eat and how much they eat of the meals provided. BUT there are NO alternatives. The family meal is the family meal. This removes pressure and battles from meal time. There is no coercion around food or finishing everything on their plates. We model the food and eating behaviours we want them to share, and over time they learn to trust and listen to their bodies, serve themselves and and make good food choices. We do a lot of placing everything in the middle and letting them serve themselves. Below are rice paper wraps, fish wedges and salad, Mexican wraps/bowls plus nuggets and veg

 

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They learn to love their food!
  • We are aware of our kids likes/dislike and food preferences around textures (due to SPD) etc – But that does not mean that we simply stop serving the foods that one of them dislikes. We do talk to them when we’re creating our menu. Then they know that there is lots of food coming up that they do enjoy. If we are serving a meal that we know is not a favourite, we make sure that there are some things on the plate that they are comfortable with. If we are serving up a new meal (and one I suspect will not be well received!) I make sure that a small portion of it is on the plate (simply having the food near them helps with exposure and familiarity) but kept a bit separate from the other familiar food. Below is when we introduced mushroom stroganoff – all in one for the adults and separately, without pressure for the kids.

 

  • We encourage our kids to be involved with food, right from growing our veggies and helping with the gardening to helping us to prepare and serve the food.

 

  • We allow and encourage food exploration. Touching, poking, licking, sniffing … all fine (at our home dinner table!). Also we talk about our food in a way that removes pressure: What colour it is? Does it crunch or squish when you bite it? It is different cooked to raw? Can you write you name with it or make a face?
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Mum! Listen to this crunch!
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Wonder who is responsible for this one?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Food is not ‘good or bad’. It is not a moral choice. We do talk about what food gives us and how it makes us feel – this food will give me lots of protein and help me build up my muscles. This food will give me good energy to get through a long gymnastics session. This food has lots of fibre and it will help me to poop (a kids favourite!). If I eat too much of this food my tummy doesn’t feel good. We also talk about our favourite foods and our special memories around food – after all food is about far more than just nutrients!
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Muscles from our Hulk muffins
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Christmas Food with my extended family – my very favourite celebration!
  • We keep food really simple. We eat a lot of food that looks like this (you’ll see in our menu that we call them ‘serve yourself platters’):
  • There is no ‘snack box’ in the pantry filled with packaged and ‘easy’ snacks and the kids are not free to just help themselves whenever they want. There are defined meal and snack times. After which the kitchen is closed. This helps them to learn to listen to their bodies and actually be ready to eat properly at meal times. Kids (and adults!) don’t actually need to graze all day long. Of course there are times when then there needs to be an exception – if they ask, they know they can usually grab an apple or a carrot.
  • We cook in bulk and freeze. There are deliberate left-overs to make filling lunches and batch cooking allows the main part of the meal to be used in different ways, with very little effort on my part!
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Veggie egg cups ready for the freezer
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Bulk Mexican Chicken – this will portioned into the freezer and become wraps/bowls, enchiladas and tacos

Bulk bolognese gets turned into a 2nd meal of empanadas

  • We make school lunches the night before, for kids and adults alike. No exceptions. I cannot even fathom the stress of making 6 lunches in the morning whilst getting ready for school and work, getting washing on the line and starting dinner. Eek! Made the night before I have space to think about it, make sure is is varied and I sleep easier knowing is it one less job in the morning!
  • We snack plan/prep. As well as having a meal menu, we always have snack basics in the house ready to go.  It means that we can eat well with little fuss. Our go to snacks are lots of veggies and fruit then we add things like hummus, yoghurt, bliss balls, roasted almonds, hard boiled eggs, pikelets and popcorn.

 

 

So there is it.

We plan, we prepare, we eat simply, we eat variety that is heavily plant-based.

Importantly, our kids are involved with the food at all stages but we do not pressure them about food or force them to eat it. Parents decide what’s on offer, we give them opportunity to serve and explore, we model healthy eating behaviours but food is not a battle ground!

If you have made it to the end … well done! I know it seems confronting when you see it all  together. Can I encourage you if you are feeling overwhelmed to start simply. Pick one thing and go for it. Small changes really add up over time. Get your family involved and work on it together!

Good luck – I’m always here to answer questions!

J x

What’s in Jessie’s kitchen?

This post is to help give you an idea of the kinds of things you might need/want in your kitchen if you are a family with multiple food allergies who is looking for what you CAN eat!

After a horrible mouse plague when we lived in the desert (we’d sometimes kill more than 20 in a night inside!!), my husband agreed that everything needed to be airtight – so you can check my fridge and pantry out below:

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Nuttelex: We use Nuttlelex (a vegan butter) for the dairy free option. But we try and keep it to a minimum. A separate knife is always used here.

Butter: Plain butter without additives for the non dairy free.

Milks: Full cream cows milk for Peter and the boys, and Ellie and I use mostly oat milk but also rice and almond milk, depending on what it is we’re cooking/drinking.

Yoghurts: Homemade dairy and homemade soy.

Eggs: 5 of the 6 of us can eat eggs now (YAY!). These mostly come from friend’s chooks.

Cheese: Dairy Cheese and Bio Cheese

Dates: Medjool dates – I buy them in bulk as they are the base for soooo many things we make.

Dips and spreads: Cream Cheese (soy and dairy), sunflower seed butter& hummus,

Herbs/Spices: minced garlic, ginger and chilli, coconut aminos

We always have loads of fruit and vegetables on hand for easy snacks.

Frozen stuff: I am lucky enough to have a big freezer. It is spilt in to 6 labelled drawers (yes, I’m a massive nerd!).

Drawer 1: Breads and scrolls, pizzas and savoury muffins. These are in zip lock bags, to pull out easily for lunch-boxes.

Drawer 2: Baked goods and sauces. These are all the cakes, muffins, pikelets, frozen pastry or raw pie crusts etc. Also home-made gravies (in reusable squeezey pouches), jars of salsa, apple sauce and tablespoons of aquafaba.

Drawer 3: Meat. I buy for a month at a time based on our menu and portion it out and label it before freezing.

Drawer 4: Pre-made meals. I cook in bulk and freeze the left overs.

Drawer 5: Frozen fruits, herbs. Peeled, overripe bananas, peeled and seeded avocados and mangoes, berries, and extra herbs from my garden.

Drawer 6: Frozen Veg – peas, corn, spinach, green beans etc.

In the pantry we have:

Flours: Lots of different kinds but we largely use spelt or a GF mix. 20151023_212005

Sweeteners: Honey, maple syrup, golden syrup, rice malt syrup, coconut sugar, also icing sugar for cakes.

Carbohydrates: We use mostly brown or wild rice, but also quinoa, corn cous cous and a mix of GF pasta, spaghetti and Slim Pasta.

No egg: an egg replacer made by Orgran

Cereals: Mostly we have porridge made with plain rolled oats, but we also make our own muesli (with a mix of seeds and dried fruits) and have some Freedom Foods cereals (at the moment we have the Rice Puffs). Also rolled quinoa and polenta. Plus GF weetbix and Oat bran flakes.

Condiments etc: salt and pepper, spices (galore!), tomato, bbq, (homemade) sweet chilli sauce and coconut aminos. We use balsamic, red wine, white and apple cider vinegars, Massel stock powder (chicken, beef and vegetable style). The oil we use is mostly olive oil but also occasionally coconut oil or rice bran. I make my own Mexican Spice mix and French Onion Soup mix. Nutritional yeast features heavily too.

Spreads: Honey/maple syrup, vegemite and of course there is always a huge jar of Sunflower Seed Butter

Dried fruits: Sultanas apricots and prunes are the staples.

For baking: GF baking powder, bi-carb, glucose syrup, vanilla bean paste, cocoa/cacao.

Seeds and nuts: the regular seeds are sunflower seeds, hemp seeds, pumpkin seeds, flax seeds and chia seeds. Our regular morning tea snacks are a mixture of almonds that I dry roast, dried chick peas and dried broad beans, as well as a small sprinkling of dried fruit. In winter we have a soup mix that I make up with red lentils, yellow and green split peas and barley. Safe nuts in our house are almonds and walnuts.

Crackers and biscuits: Multi-grain rice/quinoa squares, and wholegrain sa-ka-ta rice crackers. Biscuits are normally home-made but we keep a back up packet of Macro’s ginger nuts too.

Tins: Beans and legumes, coconut cream and milk, bbq baked beans. Crushed tomatoes. Tins of salmon.

Special treats: Organ makes a good custard powder. Mini marshmallows or Sweet William chocolate or choc chips, also FreeFrom Cake mix is often on standby. Popcorn kernels – so cheap and easy!!

If they are available, for all that I buy, I tend to go for organic, preservative free and Australian grown/made where ever possible.